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Choose one argument from the historic American or global works listed below. Decide whether this argument is successful or not. If you decide this essay is successful, discuss why. You may use the structure of the argument, the tone, and the various types of support (ethos, pathos, and logos) as proof of the argument’s success. Make sure that your thesis has an introduction that contains a hook and a thesis, body paragraphs that discuss one proof at a time (one paragraph per example), and a conclusion. If you decide that the essay is not successful, then discuss the fallacies that the argument makes. You are still required to have a strong introduction (hook and thesis), body paragraphs that discuss one fallacy at a time, and a conclusion. You may also discuss how the essay is successful with reservations. In this case, point to both the support and the fallacies you have found in the work.
This paper should be at least 700 words, but no more than 850. The paper should be formatted correctly MLA style and written in third person (do not use the words I, me, us, we, or you).  The essay should also contain citations and a works cited list based on your selected essay in the assigned readings.  Formulate the structured response from your own close reading of the text. Do not use outside sources (open Web)
Historical American Works
Du Bois, W.E.B. “Of Mr. Booker T. Washington and Others.” About.com: Grammar &
Composition. 2012. Web. 11 May 2012.
Eastman, Crystal. “Now We Can Begin.” About.com: Women’s History. 2012. Web. 11 May
2012.
Fulbright, William J. “On the Arrogance of Power, 1966.” Department of Physics: University
of Washington Online. n.d. Web. 11 May 2012.
Hamilton, Alexander. “The Federalist No. 6 – Concerning Dangers from Dissensions between
the States.” Constitution Society. Nov. 11, 2011. Web. 11 May 2012.
Jefferson, Thomas. “The Unanimous Declaration of the Thirteen United States of
America.” National Archives. n.d. Web. 11 May 2012.
Murray, Judith Sargent. “On the Equality of the Sexes.” Penn Libraries. Ed. Mary
Ockerbloom. n.d. Web. 11 May 2012.
Szilard, Leo and Cosigners. “A Petition to the President of the United States.”
Atomicarchive.com. 2011. Web. 11 May 2012.
Twain, Mark. “Fenimore Cooper’s Literary Offences.” University of Virginia Library. n.d.
Web. 11 May 2012.
Twain, Mark. “The Damned Human Race.” Moodyap.pbworks.com. n.d. Web. 11 May 2012.
Historic Global Works
Aristotle. Nichomachean Ethics, Book 1. The Internet Classics Archive. n.d. Web. 11 May 2012.
Demosthenes. “The Third Philippic.” Wikisource. 11 Sept. 2009. Web. 11 May 2012.
Descartes, Rene. “Meditation II.” The Classical Library. 2001. Web. 11 May 2012.
Marx, Karl. “Bourgeois and Proletariats.” The Classical Library. 2001. Web. 11 May 2012.
Plato. “Apology.” Project Gutenberg. 2008. Web. 11 May 2012.
Swift, Jonathan. “A Modest Proposal.” The Art Bin: Origo. n.d. Web. 11 May 2012.
 

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